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Date Night: Sackets Harbor, NY

Since this summer I interned in Watertown, NY, I made it a mission of mine to explore the area. I’d previously been to Sackets Harbor, about a 10 minute drive from Watertown, when I was 13 or 14 (when nothing was cool) so it’d been a while since I was there.

My friend Meghan and I decided to take the day, or rather evening, to grab some dinner and walk around historic Sackets Harbor. Our first stop (after finally finding parking – this is the only bad thing about Sackets) was Goodfellos Brick Oven Pizza & Wine bar. Mostly all restaurants and little shops are located on Main Street. So is the harbor, Centennial Park, and the Battlefield path. We had dinner, sat by the lake, and took in the sunset. It was a perfect summer night – and I’m glad I had company but Meghan’s not really my type. Sorry Meg.

I’ve eaten at both The Boathouse and Goodfellos and each meal was deliciously prepared. They both offer outdoor seating, but if you want the view of the harbor, go with The Boathouse. The back of the restaurant gives me a modern Krusty Krab vibe, too.

On the 4th of July (the hottest day of this summer thus far), my friends and I decided to get dinner in Sackets at The Boathouse, soft-serve ice cream at Saturdays, Sundaes & More, and sit in the battlefield (along with a million other people) to enjoy the fireworks. It was brutally hot, but the environment (and food) made the day worth it. The sunset along the lake/river was incredible and we got some really great snaps, too. I don’t know which I enjoyed more – this sunset or the fireworks. Both were incredible. Both were worth the trip.

Sackets Harbor, NY is not only picturesque and lively, but also has a rich history. Founded in 1801 by Augustus Sackett, the land speculator from New York City had high hopes for trade. During the War of 1812, Sackets Harbor became the center of American naval and military activity for Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence Valley. Within a short period, military personnel numbers rose rapidly and the village’s population rivaled those of Albany and New York City.

Two battles were fought in Sackets Harbor, in 1812 and 1813, but luckily in 1814 the Treaty of Ghent was signed that ended the 3 year war.

After the war, much of the naval base was dissipated. Today, though, historic Sackets Harbor lives on. In 1913, Centennial Park, a portion of the battlefield was recognized and set aside to honor the military personnel that fought and died in the War of 1812. The battlefield, park, and historic buildings like the Sackets Harbor Visitor Center or Augustus Sacket’s mansion are available to tour. Find out more about the history and visiting Sackets Harbor here.

And by god, VISIT. Bring a friend, bring a date, bring the fam. Even just for the day, or a night, it’s worth it.

The Creativity of 3

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I’m not sure where I even found this – but I love it. 3 seems to play a significant role in humankind. It happens that three is the first number to which the meaning “all” was given.

3 signifies a beginning, a middle, and an end. Just like my brothers and I. Me, the first born – the beginning, and my brothers, the middle and the end.

Time, too. When describing time, we categorize it into past, present, and future.

3 seems to signify harmony, completion, or perfection. In the Bible, the number is repeated and used as such. God, the son, and the holy spirit. God’s attributes: omniscience, omnipresence, and omnipotence. And let’s not forget: On the third day, he rose again. 

So was this number born out of creativity or necessity? And where does this creativity come from – are we born with it? Is it something we’re taught? Why are some people more creative than others?

In this article by David Cox in the Guardian explores the question: Are people born creative? He goes on to explain that researchers have discovered that the corpus callosum, or band of nerve fibers joining the two sides of the brain, is smaller in creatives like writers, musicians, and artists, “which may augment their creativity by allowing each side of their brain to develop its own specialization.” Cool, right?

He goes on to express that other studies have shown that people with certain mental disorders tend to be more creative. Example 1 was bipolar disorder. If experiencing bipolar mania, the individual is, “experiencing excessive fast and divergent thinking, increased self-esteem, and never ending energy and motivation often to create.”

A creative myself, I find things like this so interesting. I’m on that never-ending and never satisfying quest to find out why I am the way that I am – and why others are the way that they are. Maybe I should have picked up a psychology minor!

I’m always interested in the creative process of others, too. Myself, I carry around a journal that I fill with lists and ideas that drive my creation and inspires me to learn more in order to create more. But of course, there’s creative block. I’ve been pretty lucky with my journal – normally I can find something I find interesting enough to write about just from day-to-day inspo. However, if you’re really creatively gummed up, an article that helped me was this one by Canva’s blog. Sometimes I read stuff like this when I’m not struggling to create content, and it still helps. Check it out.

While we may never know why the number three was created, we can at least admit that it was born out of a necessity of the human mind to imagine. We’ve got science to back that one up. As for the magic-ness of certain triads, keep them in mind. They may just be your ticket to imaginative harmony.